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21 Mar 2023
KPSRL
Leiden University College, Floor 1
Fireside Peace Chats: Father Dionysius Mintoff
Join us for our latest Fireside Peace Chats event, co-hosted by Leiden University College, on 21 March. These events are informal, intimate discussions with global expert peacebuilders. Join us in hearing Fr Dionysius Mintoff from Malta on how to work for peace at the global level. Fr Mintoff will share his thoughts on how to address the key challenge faced by the world. He will announce the International Laboratory for Peace in The Hague that will focus on dialogue, education and practical solutions for peace. Walk-in registrations are welcome! Simply arrive at the location, Leiden University College Floor 1. In 2010 Fr Mintoff was awarded the inaugural FI Human Rights Award in Geneva, Switzerland and is a co-founder of Franciscans International. His Peace Lab was founded in Malta in 1971 with a mission for peace education. Today it also acts as a sanctuary for refugees and is a place of learning, inclusion, and acceptance regardless of personal beliefs. Programme:  17:30-19:00 Dialogue  Welcome Remarks by Robert Micallef, Lecturer Leiden University Key Note Intervention: Fr Dionysius Mintoff, Founder of Peace Lab Reflections and Q&A: Dr. Maja Vodopovic, Assistant Professor, Leiden University Fr. Dionysius Mintoff established the Pope John XIII Peace Laboratory in 1971, following an appeal made by Pope John XXIII, who called for the world to reflect on peace. “As a Franciscan, and a Maltese who has personally seen the outcomes of war, I decided to open a space that advocates for peace education in Malta” he explained some years ago in an interview. And it is no secret that Fr. Mintoff had been hoping to personally welcome the Pope and show him around, during the Apostolic Visit to Malta that had been scheduled for 31 May 2020 and was postponed due to the pandemic. The Peace Lab runs an extensive adult education programme. It has its headquarters at Hal Far, a site that was originally part of the HalFar airfield which saw intensive air combats during World War II.
20 Mar 2023
KPSRL
Virtually Accessible
Unboxing Localisation IV: Measuring Localisation
How do we capture progress on our ambitions to work more localized and do we indeed see that such ways of working lead to better results? NEAR will share its Localisation Performance Measurement Framework, after which an in-country partner (NAHAB), an INGO (consultant Patrick Crump) and a donor (NL MFA) reflect on its applicability. Of course, there will also be plenty of room for you to share your views and initiatives on this theme with the other participants. Click here to download the agenda in English and click here to download the agenda in French. This is an invitation-only event. If you would like to participate, please email c.kuitert@kpsrl.org.  
22 Feb 2023
KPSRL
Leiden University College, Floor 1
Fireside Peace Chats: Decolonising Religion, Conflict and Peace: Resisting the Binary Islam vs the West/Rest
Join us for our latest Fireside Peace Chats event, co-hosted by Leiden University College, on February 22nd. These events are informal, intimate discussions with global expert peacebuilders. The event focuses on the geopolitics of peace & conflict and decolonizing the debate on religion and peace & conflict. The speaker will focus on Sri Lanka as a case study with possibilities for comparative conflict analysis with Northern Ireland and Korea as well. No registration is required! Simple arrive at the location, Leiden University College Floor 1, for a welcoming, educational, and informal atmosphere to learn about and discuss peacebuilding and decolonization. Jude Lal Fernando is Associate Professor at the School of Religion, Theology, and Peace Studies at Trinity College, University of Dublin. He is the director of Trinity Centre for Post-Conflict Justice. His latest publications are Resistance to Empire and Militarization: Reclaiming the Sacred ( 2021) and Faith in the Face of Militarization: Indigenous, Feminist and Interreligious Voices ( 2022). He has been a visiting professor in Tampere University in Finland, Uppsala University in Sweden and Ritsukeikan and Sophia Universities in Japan. He is the Coordinator of the People's Tribunal on Sri Lanka ( Dublin, Bremen and Berlin Tribunals) and lives in exile in Ireland due to his opposition to war against the Tamils in Sri Lanka.
07 Dec 2022
KPSRL
Beeld en Geluid
ARC Global Closing Event
Background For the past decade, addressing the root causes of conflict and irregular migration through ’’bottom up’’ civil society engagement and fragile states has been a priority for Netherlands Ministry of Foreign Affairs (MFA). The Addressing Root Causes fund(ARC fund-2016-2021) has been the latest centrally managed tender program that the MFA’s department for Stabilization and Humanitarian Aid (DSH) has launched and managed to this effect. Beyond implementation, the ARC program had the ambition to build a community of practice in which members take collective responsibility for learning, reflect on common challenges, encourage innovation and develop a repertoire of collective resources (experiences, stories, tools etc.). Building from lessons learned as part of ARC implementation and learning related endeavors, regional learning symposiums have been organized by ARC partners in May 2022, in order to capitalize on experience from peace, security and justice programs through collaborative learning and knowledge sharing, to establish shared understanding on lessons learned and best practice, as well as analyze challenges and opportunities on dealing with addressing root causes of conflict and insecurity in the Great Lakes Region, Horn of Africa and Sahel Region. Building from the said regional events, a global closing event will be organized in The Hague on December 7th and 8th, 2022 by the Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs (BZ), the Knowledge Platform Security and Rule of Law (KPSRL) and ARC partners. The global event will offer space to discuss common lessons which can be learned across programs and how they could be fed into portfolio reflection for future programming and policy. Click here to download the full Concept Note. When The event will take place over two days, on December 7th and 8th, 2022.  Where On December 7th, sessions will be held online from 9:00AM to 1:15PM Hague Time. On December 8th,  sessions will be held in-person in The Hague at Beeld en Geluid from 9:00AM to 5:00PM; with the possibility to participate remotely.
23 Nov 2022
KPSRL
Coasters, Floor 1, Leiden University College, The Hague
Fireside Peace Chats: Perpetual Peacebuilding? Perspectives from Bosnia & Herzegovina
Fireside Peace Chats series are informal, intimate chats with peacebuilders who have either lived in for an extended period of time or are from conflict-affected environments. This is the first event kicking off the series. Dr. Randall Puljek-Shank has more than 20 years of experience in peacebuilding in the Western Balkans in programme design, implementation, training, evaluation, and research. Randall holds a PhD in Political Science from the Radboud University Nijmegen. His doctoral research deepened his interest in the intersection of civil society and politics of ethnically divided societies.
20 Oct 2022
KPSRL
Louwman Museum + Online!
Annual Conference 2022: Reimagining Social Contracts
News We're going hybrid again! On 20 October, 2022, we are thrilled to be able to welcome our participants in-person at a beautiful venue, the Louwman Museum, in The Hague, as well as online through our virtual venue.  Click here to view this year's program. Click here to view this year's Program Timetable. Click here to check out the virtual venue that we built last year. Click here to view this year's Concept Note. About the Conference The Knowledge Platform Annual Conference #KPAC22 is the Platform's signature event that brings together our vibrant community for thought-provoking discussions. This year will be our 10th Annual Conference, and as in previous years, we invite representatives from national and international governments and policy organs, think-thanks, journalists, INGO practitioners, activists, diplomats, and field researchers from around the globe to join us. These diverse actors assemble each year with a singular aim: to present their latest projects and freshest ideas, and engage their peers to learn and improve security and justice policy and programs. This year's theme is Reimagining Social Contracts. What is the glue that holds societies together? In the Western tradition of political thought, the answer is often the ‘social contract’: citizens giving up part of their freedom in exchange for a stake in society and collective services. That contract is a fiction; there is no such document, and every societal arrangement has its own history and form. Humans were never free and unbound in the state of nature. However, it is a useful fiction. It provides us with a common language for the ‘bigger picture’ of what is fair and just; who gets what and who provides it. Using this fiction, we see how many countries struggle in coming to inclusive, legitimate and sustainable societal arrangements. Simultaneously, we see that international interveners struggle to achieve their aims because of factors linked to broader societal arrangements or due to the application of Western ideas in societies with different a ideological background, culture or history. Reflecting on this, the Knowledge Platform Security & Rule of Law (KPSRL) community indicated the need to Reimagine Social Contracts. This means supporting indigenous solutions and community responses to Security & Rule of Law (SRoL) arrangements and reflecting on the role Western actors play in doing so. Our use of the verb ‘reimagining’ includes a series of interconnected moments and actions, although in practice never chronological nor separate. Three key points of reimagining are envisioned to constitute the ‘flow of the day’ for KPAC22 and are thus central in our call for contributions: Reinvent, Rearrange & Renegotiate. Please read the full Concept Note to learn more. Attention all artists, artivists, creatives, dreamers: we are calling on you to share creative expressions of - or contributions towards - reimagining social contracts. In the lead up to the big day, we are unpacking what social contracts actually are and what reimagining can look like. One of the ways we are doing this is through a this call for contributions to artistically interpret what Reimagining Social Contracts can mean. There are two ways to respond to this call: 1) sharing an art piece that you created yourself; 2) sharing an art piece made by someone else that you appreciate and resonate with, that inspired you or others to reimagine social arrangements and relations. For example, think of a song that became an anthem of a protest, a street art that connected conflicted communities, a poem about security or performance for reconciliation. To submit a piece, you should simply share your post on LinkedIn or Twitter (Instagram coming soon), tagging us along with the hashtag: #InspiREimagine. If the piece you’re sharing is your original, please add the 2nd hashtag: #MyLens. Artwork submitted by 30 September will be displayed and shared at our Annual Conference, and the original art piece that generates the most likes on social media during the voting period 1-10 October will win a small prize. We encourage you to explore all different kinds of mediums: audio, visual, movement, and more. Our Secretariat team will also be sharing some of our own ideas and interpretations – so be sure to follow us on LinkedIn or Twitter (Instagram coming soon)! Please help us disseminate this call and… let’s get creative!
12 Jul 2022
KPSRL
Virtually Accessible
Kick-Off Webinar: Reimagining Social Contracts
Context: Unpacking KPSRL Thematic Headline Towards KPAC22 In the run-up to our KPSRL Annual Conference (‘KPAC22’) in October, KPSRL wants to start unpacking this year’s thematic headline of ‘Reimagining Social Contracts’. The idea for such an ‘unpacking trajectory’ is firstly exploring the concept itself in this kick-off webinar, after which we further apply it to more specific subthemes in subsequent events or deliverables. The Kick-Off Webinar On Tuesday 12 July (14:30 – 16:00 CEST), we will host our kick-off webinar in order to: (1) unpack the uses of the concept of a ‘social contract’ for the Security & Rule of Law sector. (2) gather input from our community on possible contributions to the other ‘unpacking activities’. In the webinar, we suggest to explore the usefulness (and redundancy) of the lens of social contracts for SRoL: how is such a concept useful in contexts with limited state capacity and/or intra-elite competition? What can or should Western SRoL actors learn from ‘non-Western’ ideas of social contracts? And how can this lens help us to reimagine security and rule of law arrangements, or SRoL interventions? Do we see recent (regional) trends of how (re)negotiations of social contracts take form? We do that by looking at the Middle East and North Africa region, with the help of these two discussants: Amal Bourhrous works for SIPRI, where she worked on several reports on social contracts in the MENA region (namely Libya, Iraq and Lebanon) from several angles. A.o., this entails a paper on protests across the region, the (ethno)sectarian political systems in Iraq and Lebanon, and an exploration of how Iraqis envision a reimagined social contract. Laila Al-Zwaini will bring in her experience as an Arabist and legal expert, researching ‘non-Western’ concepts of citizenship, civil, civility and civilization (madaniya) and non-western forms of key services for a social contract (shari’a law) – concepts that can provoke the SRoL community to think beyond its western-oriented state principles. Agenda It will be a 90 minutes session where two discussants kick off the conversation in a moderated, 35 minute conversation during which there will already be moments where the KPSRL community can join in. However, the remaining time is specifically dedicated for discussion amongst the audience.  
02 May 2022
KPSRL
Virtually Accessible
Unboxing Localisation: An Inclusive Dialogue Trajectory
On May 2nd, KPSRL supports Civil Society Platform for Peacebuilding and Statebuilding (CSPPS) and the Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs (MFA) in their launch of a learning trajectory on 'Unboxing Localisation for SDG16+'. The aim is to provide strategic and practical input for localisation policy and programming through an exploratory and iterative co-creation process between relevant actors within the NL MFA, CSPPS/Cordaid, and external, linked (Southern) civil society organisations and partners in the realm of SDG16+. A central goal is learning from Southern partners in what practical ways donors and INGOs can support them best in doing their work. If you are interested in attending, please email Christian Kuitert (c.kuitert@kpsrl.org).
27 Apr 2022
KPSRL
Virtually Accessible
Webinar: Jeunesse et citoyenneté: réinventer la politique en Afrique subsaharienne?
La jeunesse africaine est devenue un acteur collectif majeur des transformations sociopolitiques survenues sur le continent, souvent par ses engagements pacifiques en faveur de sociétés plus inclusives et plus démocratiques, au-delà du formalisme institutionnel. Ces jeunes, ouverts sur le monde et utilisant les réseaux sociaux pour s'exprimer et nouer des alliances, réclament non seulement un accès aux opportunités et aux meilleures conditions socio-économiques, ils incarnent surtout de nouvelles façons de faire et de vivre la politique. Un processus d'institutionnalisation des revendications a pris la forme de mouvements citoyens structurés, comme «Y'en a marre» au Sénégal, «Le Balai Citoyen» en Burkina Faso, ou "Filimbi" et "Lucha" en RD Congo. Michel Luntumbue et Claire Kupper présenteront leur livre électronique (E-Book) : «Jeunesse africaine, fracture générationnelle et réinvention du lien politique en Afrique subsaharienne ». Quatre acteurs de la société civile africaine, militants de mouvements citoyens emblématiques, réagiront à cette présentation et partageront leurs points de vue sur les perspectives des nouvelles formes d’engagement des jeunesses africaines dans les luttes pour des changements politiques. Cette table ronde virtuelle est organisée dans le cadre d’un projet du GRIP répondant à l’appel d’offre du Knowledge Management Fund (KMF), dont l’objectif est de soutenir des initiatives innovantes qui contribuent à améliorer les connaissances dans le domaine de la sécurité et du renforcement de l'Etat de droit, en particulier dans les contextes fragiles et touchés par les conflits.
01 Apr 2022
KPSRL
Virtually Accessible
Webinar: 'Applying SRoL lessons from Afghanistan to the Sahel'
Although the situation in Afghanistan is not dominating the headlines as it did by the end of last year, the effects on both security and especially the humanitarian situation are still ongoing. KPSRL previously held a closed roundtable whereby SRoL experts gave input to the Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs on how to keep supporting the SRoL situation in Afghanistan. Now, it’s important to involve the whole KPSRL community to broaden that discussion in an open webinar, by linking it to SRoL (development cooperation) challenges in other contexts - with the Sahel as an urgent focus. Dutch researcher Dr. Willemijn Verkoren will first share her perspective, given her research experiences on conflict, security and preventing violent extremism - culminating into her recent book ‘Out Of The Spiral Of Violence’ and her recent position paper to Dutch Parliament on the situation in Afghanistan. Afterward, Dr. Niagalé Bagayoko will complement those reflections from an African Security Sector perspective, given her role as chair of the African Security Sector Network. As always with KPSRL, there will be plenty of time for the audience to step into the discussion, share their experiences and ask questions to our two guests.
18 Nov 2021
KPSRL
Virtually Accessible
(Closed) Expert Roundtable ‘Initial SRoL Lessons From Afghanistan’
On Thursday, November 18th, KPSRL facilitates a roundtable where a group of experts on Afghanistan will step into dialogue with policy makers from the Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs. Given the recent turnover of power in Afghanistan, the aim is to identify which long-term implications should be further investigated - both for Security & Rule of Law (SRoL) in Afghanistan and its implications for the SRoL sector more broadly. If you have any questions or interest in this event, please email Christian Kuitert (c.kuitert@kpsrl.org).
14 Oct 2021
KPSRL
Annual Conference 2021: Asymmetric Power
Sessions & Timetable Please click here for the Conference timetable and check out all of our sessions! About the Conference The Knowledge Platform Annual Conference #KPAC21 is the Platform's signature event that brings together our vibrant community for thought-provoking discussions. This year will be our 9th Annual Conference, and as in previous years, we invite representatives from national and international governments and policy organs, think-thanks, journalists, INGO practitioners, activists, diplomats, and field researchers from around the globe to join us. These diverse actors assemble each year with a singular aim: to present their latest projects and freshest ideas, and engage their peers to learn and improve security and justice policy and programs. This year's theme is Asymmetric Power. The KPSRL community has become increasingly vocal about seizing this moment of upheaval to redress asymmetric power structures. While the sector has long been preoccupied with inequality and injustice in societies, pressure has been mounting to address unequal power distribution within the peace and development sector itself. Rallying cries have risen around ‘decolonizing aid’, radical flexibility in financing and accountability, and donor commitments to affirm transformative resilience and strengthen the localization of support. These encouraging aspirations, however, must attend to legacies of exclusion, inequality and asymmetry; not only within societies, but also within SRoL and development partnerships.   Click here to download the full concept note. News To gain access to the KPSRL Annual Conference you will have to show your EU Digital COVID Certificate (DCC) to demonstrate your vaccination status upon arrival at the venue. Please make sure that you have the following ready when arriving onsite: • Your photo ID • Digital COVID Certificate proof of vaccination, recovery or 24hr negative test result Please click here for a more detailed description of our COVID-19 safety regulations for KPAC21. Keynote Speaker This year, we are honored to welcome Séverine Autesserre to the KPSRL Annual Conference 2021 as our Keynote Speaker. Dr. Autesserre is an award-winning author, peacebuilder, and researcher, as well as a Professor of Political Science at Barnard College, Columbia University. She is the author of The Frontlines of Peace, Peaceland, and The Trouble with the Congo, in addition to articles for publications such as The New York Times, The Washington Post, Foreign Affairs, and Foreign Policy.  Please click here to read her full bio.  
13 Oct 2021
KPSRL
Beeld en Geluid
Book Reading & Signing: "The Frontlines of Peace" with author Séverine Autesserre
In her new book, The Frontlines of Peace, Séverine Autesserre sheds light on how typical aid interveners have been getting it wrong, and—more importantly—how a few of them have been getting it right. Based off her own experiences from across the globe, Autesserre reveals that peace can grow in the most unlikely circumstances. She tells the stories of the ordinary, yet extraordinary individuals and communities that have found effective ways to confront violence. By detailing the concrete, everyday actions that make a difference on the ground, Autesserre challenges prevailing wisdom about war, peacekeeping, and conflict resolution. She shows that we must radically change our approach if we hope to build lasting peace around us—whether we live in Congo, the United States, or elsewhere. Join us for an intimate discussion with the author for a book reading and signing event in The Hague on October 13th, the day before the KPSRL Annual Conference. You can purchase her book by clicking this link, or buy one at the event itself. This event is co-hosted by the KPSRL & The American Book Centre in The Hague. Please note that the seats for this event are limited, so registration will happen on a first come, first serve basis. Registrants will be contacted leading up to the event with more information about COVID-19 safety precautions and details about the event.
15 Sep 2021
KPSRL
Virtually Accessible
A meta-analysis of the Dialogue and Dissent Strategic Partnerships Sense-making workshop
Background From 2016-2020, the Department for Stabilization and Humanitarian Aid (DSH) of the Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs managed five Dialogue and Dissent Strategic Partnerships, for lobbying and advocacy purposes, together with CARE Nederland, CORDAID, GPPAC, NIMD and PAX. All programs have been evaluated, which led to interesting insights on what the programs delivered, how the partnership worked, and what the challenges have been. A meta-analysis exercise focusing on some relevant findings and conclusions of the evaluations is currently being conducted to find out whether some common lessons can be learned across the programs. The exercise also aims to determine how such lessons can also be used for the new partnerships of DSH under Power of Voices, possible new (SRoL) policies, the Theory of Change and finally for portfolio management. The meta-analysis aims to be a joint exercise of Dialogue and Dissent partner organizations and the Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs, under the technical facilitation of the Knowledge Platform Security and Rule of Law. Building from the results of the meta-analysis exercise, a sense-making workshop to discuss key findings will be held on September 15th, 2021. Participants will dive deep into the meta-analysis findings and discuss recommendations and the uptake process for future programming and policy-making. Please click here to download the full concept note. Guiding Questions How was learning embedded in the programs (TOC development, learning agenda development, learning agenda implementation)? How and to what extent did this lead to (good practices of) adaptive programming in fragile contexts? What were the challenges and what contribution did adaptive programming have on better results? How did the (strategic nature of the) partnership concept work, with specific attention to the role that MFA HQs and the embassies played?; including on how an enabling environment was created for learning and adaptation. Registration In case of questions, please send an email to Giorgio Ferrari at G.Ferrari@kpsrl.org or Messina Laurette MANIRAKIZA at M.Manirakiza@kpsrl.org.
02 Sep 2021
KPSRL
Virtually Accessible
Webinar: Time to Decolonise Aid
Background This webinar will give participants the opportunity to delve into the main findings and recommendations from Peace Direct's recent report 'Time to Decolonise Aid' which examines structural racism in the humanitarian, development and peacebuilding sectors. The report presents the highlights and insights of a 3 day global consultation which involved almost 160 practitioners, academics and activists from around the world. Speakers Dylan Mathews is the CEO of Peace Direct. He also serves as Vice Chair of the Alliance for Peacebuilding, a US-based peacebuilding network with over 120 member organisations worldwide. Shannon Paige is Policy Associate at Peace Direct. Shannon is the lead author of the 'Time to Decolonise Aid' report and leads on Peace Direct's decolonising research and advocacy. Registration Registration is mandatory to attend this event. Please register by clicking the button below. If you have any questions or concerns, you can reach out to Messina Laurette Manirakiza at m.manirakiza@kpsrl.org or Melissa Krassenstein at m.krassenstein@kpsrl.org
24 Jun 2021
KPSRL
Virtually Accessible
ARC Learning Event on VSLAs in Nexus Programming
Background The Addressing Root Causes (ARC) Programme in South Sudan seeks to build the resilience of nineteen communities (payams) of diverse and sometimes conflictive ethnic groups in four counties across Jonglei state to endure economic- or conflict-induced shocks through peacebuilding and economic development work. The three programme outcomes—Economic Resilience, Peaceful Conflict Resolution, and Social Cohesion—are mutually reinforcing and together contribute to more resilience and a culture of peace. This programme combines humanitarian programming with development and peacebuilding and is therefore an example of a ‘triple nexus’  programme. Village Savings and Loans Associations (VSLAs)  have been introduced in the programme in order to assist women and men to save and invest money in launching (small) economic enterprises. The MTR findings of the ARC programme indicate that access to loans and training of VSLA groups is empowering women and youth in the targeted communities to engage in Income Generating Activities (IGAs) and micro-enterprises, thereby broadening their livelihood and resilience options and creating market linkages with traders across different ethnic communities. To learn more about how VSLAs supported by ARC in South Sudan have been contributing to the programme’s social cohesion outcome, and how they have been adapting to the changing context (due to pandemic, floods and conflict), CARE Nederland has commissioned a study centred around the following main research question: ‘How does men and women’s participation in VSLAs in fragile and conflict affected settings   (FCAS) affect social cohesion in the community?’ This research will be finalized in June 2021 and will culminate in a learning brief. The Event Together with KPSRL, CARE Nederland wants to organize a learning session to share the main findings of the research and to facilitate discussion related to the potential of economic programming (esp. savings groups) for social cohesion in FCAS. If there are sufficient findings from the study we will also explain how resilient the VSLAs have proven in case of the pandemic, floods and conflict. Questions that will be addressed in the session are: 1. What are the enabling factors/characteristics of VSLAs in FCAS that impact social cohesion both within communities and with other, surrounding communities of different ethnic background? 2. How do VSLAs and the emerging income-generating activities and micro-businesses enable women to build bridges with other communities/ethnicities? 3. How does the involvement of young men in VSLA groups (in cattle camps) affect their attitudes and behavior with regards to social cohesion - in and between - communities? Speakers Katie Whipkey, Research Consultant Sarah Ward, Post-conflict/Post-disaster Market Systems Specialist CARE South Sudan Speaker TBA Registration Registration is mandatory to attend this event. Please register by clicking the button below. If you have any questions or concerns, you can reach out to Messina Manirakiza at m.manirakiza@kpsrl.org or Berlinda Nolles at nolles@carenederland.org    Please click here for all answers to the Q&A that took place in the chat during the event.
21 Jun 2021
KPSRL
Virtually Accessible
(Closed Roundtable): Draft findings of Inclusive Governance desk research
On Monday, June 21st, the results of desk study on inclusive governance will be presented internally to Dutch policy makers of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. In this meeting. a first draft of the desk study - performed by the European Centre for Development Policy Management – will be presented and its initial recommendations will be discussed. These discussions will feed into a finalized version with recommendations on how The Netherlands can more effectively position itself into the international debate on Inclusive Governance. Once finished, a public version will be available on the KPSRL website.
17 Jun 2021
KPSRL
Virtually Accessible
Exploring the Intersections of Climate Change, Access to Justice and Rule of Law
Background Climate change is an obstacle to achieving the 2030 Agenda, recognized as having adverse effects on the most excluded constituencies, including women and youth, in fragile and conflict-affected contexts. The Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs recognizes the cross-cutting nature of the climate crisis by integrating it across policy and programming, notably including the intersection between climate change, access to justice, and rule of law reflected in the Access to Justice Strategy. This is an area of emerging and promising research and practice, but the range of evidence-based interventions at the climate-justice nexus remains limited. This event aims to build on recent relevant analysis, and the broader relevant literature on intersections such as climate-conflict, to explore how the effects of climate change intersect with perceived injustices that might lead to conflict, related to access to resources like land and water or spaces for safe settlement, and how efforts to expand access to justice and rule of law might mitigate those effects. It will seek to illuminate what policymakers and practitioners in the justice sector can do to respond to the multi-dimensional threat of climate change, including broader opportunities to promote legal empowerment, trust-building and inclusive governance through access to justice and rule of law. Objectives 1. Spotlight insights and knowledge gaps from research and practice 2. Share experiences from evolving practices of promoting access to justice and the rule of law, and how these deal with the impacts of climate change, especially for excluded constituencies 3. Discuss opportunities for a longer-term joint learning agenda Agenda & Speakers Please click here to download the final agenda featuring all speakers. Registration Registration is mandatory to attend this event. Please register by clicking the button below. If you have any questions or concerns, you can reach out to Christian Kuitert at c.kuitert@kpsrl.org or Michael Warren at m.warren@idlo.int.
10 Jun 2021
KPSRL
Virtually Accessible
Webinar: The Virus and Violence
Background Well into the second year of the deadliest pandemic in a century, a growing number of studies have sought to unpack the link between COVID-19 and conflict. However, those studies tend to either rely on anecdotal evidence, or they systematically focus on one outcome only: violence. Yet, we know that the effects of exogenous shocks like a pandemic on conflict can take time to develop and may not be reflected in immediate surges in violence. At least some of the causal mechanisms between COVID-19 and violent conflict, if they exist at all, are most likely indirect. Factors such as socio-economic marginalization, diminished state capacity, and an erosion of social cohesion potentially serve as key mediating factors that develop gradually or initially operate latently. In other words, we must consider the potential impact of the pandemic on conflict drivers and processes, not just outcomes such as violence. To account for the possible effects of COVID-19 on overall conflict dynamics, Mercy Corps has led research using a systems-level approach in three conflict-affected countries: Afghanistan, Colombia, and Nigeria. A more holistic assessment of the pandemic’s impact thus far will help to not only anticipate changes in conflict dynamics and identify leverage points for humanitarian, development, and peacebuilding interventions, but also flag vulnerabilities for further disease spread and the factors that help and hinder public health responses, including vaccination campaigns. In an online webinar hosted by the Knowledge Platform for Security and Rule of Law, two of Mercy Corps researchers who led this study will present its findings, as well as discuss its implications for future policy and programming. Speakers Gabrielle Aron, Research Project Lead, Mercy Corps Sheilla Uzor Onasanya, Strategic Learning Manager, Mercy Corps Nigeria Frank Huisingh, Stabilization & Humanitarian Aid, Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs Registration Registration is mandatory to attend this event. Please register by clicking the button below. If you have any questions or concerns, you can reach out to Messina Laurette Manirakiza at m.manirakiza@kpsrl.org or Sarah Casteran at scasteran@mercycorps.org.
01 Apr 2021
KPSRL
Virtually Accessible
Using the Political Accommodation Methodology to Address Root Causes of Conflict: A Lessons Learned Webinar
Background Conflict Dynamics International (“Conflict Dynamics”) was established in 2004 and opened its East Africa Branch Office in Nairobi in 2014 conflict Dynamics’ initiatives are organized into two intersecting program areas to develop and implement innovative strategies for conflict prevention and resolution, and for humanitarian policy relevant to conflicts and other crises. These program areas are:  Humanitarian Action and Peace Action. Objectives The objective of the session are to: Share lessons learned on the PA methodology Inform the unique features, advantages, and limitations of the PA methodology Make recommendations for the future use of the methodology in peacebuilding, focusing on addressing exclusion. Session format An hour and half webinar open to ARC Program grantees and other practitioners, researchers and policy makers working to address root causes of conflict. The webinar will be followed by a recorded podcast available for future use by the partners, donors and the wider peace practitioners. Outcomes/ Deliverables Partners obtain an understanding of the lessons on the PA methodology CDI was able to learn on what works and what doesn’t. Partners share their insights on the potential of the methodology drawing on their own experiences. Partners understand the unique aspects and contribution of the PA methodology. A lessons-learned podcast for future accessibility and use by the donors, practitioners and other interested parties is produced. Speakers Gerard Mc Hugh: President Mai Tarig Amir: Sudan Program Director Roger Middleton: Somalia Program Director Moderated by KPSRL For the full concept note, please click here.
23 Feb 2021
KPSRL
Virtually Accessible
Accessing Justice: Alternative Dispute Resolution in Somalia
The International Development Law Organization (IDLO), Cordaid and the International Commission of Jurists (ICJ) are organizing an Implementer Dialogue on “Accessing Justice: Alternative Dispute Resolution in Somalia.” The Dialogue will convene practitioners in the fields of rule of law and access to justice to discuss findings from IDLO’s latest research on Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) centers in Somalia, while also providing an opportunity for exchange of lessons learned and good practices on strengthening linkages between formal and customary and informal (CIJ) justice mechanisms in diverse contexts. To ensure access to justice for all and support the development of peaceful and inclusive societies and effective, accountable, and inclusive institutions under Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 16, justice systems must innovate and meet people’s everyday justice needs.  The Implementer Dialogue will convene practitioners in the fields of rule of law and access to justice to discuss findings from IDLO’s latest report on Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) centers in Somalia, while also providing an opportunity for exchange of lessons learned and good practices on strengthening linkages between formal and customary and informal (CIJ) justice mechanisms in diverse contexts. Attached is the invitation letter and concept note. The dialogue forms part of a series of engagement with implementing partners working to improve access to justice and enhance performance of justice sector institutions in their respective geographic areas of focus in order to develop high-impact and high-quality programming . Previous dialogues in this series have proven to foster positive exchanges on lessons generated from programs and created opportunities for joint initiatives and partnerships. We look forward to welcoming you. For any questions, please email Zainab Malik (Program Development Specialist, IDLO) (zmalik@idlo.int)  
18 Feb 2021
KPSRL
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M&E Thursday Talk – Creating Connections in the Time of COVID-19
Covid-19 has demonstrated the importance of connection in our daily lives. Connection to one another, to our peers, to resources, to partner organizations, and to others working to address similar problems. That is why we have launched ConnexUs. ConnexUs is a global networking & coordination platform for NGOs, practitioners, academics, and activists working in conflict-affected settings. Peacebuilding organizations, and NGOs more broadly, have played a key role in the delivery of critical services in response to Covid-19. However, our response to the pandemic demonstrated that in the face of an interconnected problem, we had a disconnected response. ConnexUs was designed to address this connection challenge, and provide a structure/network for organisations and practitioners to engage with partners at the local, national, and international level. Join this webinar to discuss the connection and coordination challenges that were emphasized by Covid-19, and how you and your organization can become a part of the ConnexUs community.
04 Feb 2021
KPSRL
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“A Savage Order” with Rachel Kleinfeld
Background What do you do when the foxes are guarding the henhouse? In the field of Security & Rule of Law much is known, assumed and discussed about interventions and programs that have been shown to improve justice or reduce violence and increase security. But, what can be done when violence has become part-and-parcel of a state’s political system? And how does a democratic state become increasingly complicit in violence? What can be done to bring societies back from the brink of entrenched violence?  These are some of the questions that Rachel Kleinfeld, senior fellow at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, set out to explore when writing her book “Savage Order: How the world’s deadliest countries can forge a path to security”.  In this book, Dr Kleinfeld reminds us that, while the language of “failed” or “fragile” states can provoke despair, there are important examples of societies that have emerged from entrenched violence, becoming stable democracies once again – and sometimes at a surprisingly rapid pace. What lessons can be learned from looking at settings where politically-enabled violence (referred to as “privilege violence” in the book) was eventually de-escalated and societies were able to build back social trust?      The Knowledge Platform is honored to have a discussion with Dr Kleinfeld about her work, and to dig into what her findings might mean for how SRoL policy and practice can be improved, better attuned to realities on the ground. We look forward to discussing how ‘privilege violence’ comes about, how it can be recognized, and how it can be unraveled. The event also provides our community with an opportunity to critically discuss the assumptions underlying inclusive governance policies, civil society strengthening programs, and recent focus on ‘local resilience’ as pathways to stability.  Speaker Dr Rachel Kleinfeld, is a Senior Fellow in the Democracy, Conflict, and Governance Program at The Carnegie Endowment for International Peace (CIEP). At CEIP she focuses on issues of rule of law, security, and governance in post-conflict, fragile states, and states in transition. She was the founding CEO of the Truman National Security Project, where she spent close to a decade leading a movement of national security, political, and military leaders working to promote people and policies that strengthen security, stability, rights and human dignity in the world.   Objectives Gain a deeper understanding of how violence may be condoned and enabled by political actors and entrenched in democratic societies  Reflect on what can be learned from countries that have emerged from these  patterns of entrenched, state-complicit violence  Discuss how current trends in SRoL thinking could be critiqued in light of these findings, and what such critique could offer for improving SRoL policy and programming.  Registration Registration for this event is now closed. Please e-mail info@kpsrl.org if you have any questions. You can view the recording of the webinar below.
28 Jan 2021
KPSRL
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Security and Rule of Law and Building Back Better: Why localization matters in promoting inclusive and sustainable development in a post-COVID world
Background COVID-19 compounds broader challenges of conflict, poverty, inequality, food security and stability, and deeply undermines development efforts. This is particularly true for fragile and conflict affected settings, and this is why any attempt to respond to the pandemic must go well beyond the sole emergency/humanitarian framework. Ensuring that the response provided is contextualized (and values/strengthens the local capacity), comprehensive and multidimensional is key. The Humanitarian-Development-Peace (HDP) nexus provides an interesting framework within which to unpack localization. Using the HDP nexus lens, the online discussion will unpack the localization agenda by discussing its key principles and how it can promote inclusive and sustainable recovery. Looking especially at fragile and (post) conflict settings where security and rule of law (SRL) remains a crucial sector and where nexus approaches for food security and stability are applied in resilience, livelihoods and markets programming. By discussing the importance of localization and understanding the different examples and evidences in practice, SRL as well as humanitarian, development partners and other stakeholders, including the Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs, will be equipped with program and policy recommendations that enable effective use of COVID-19 and development related funding in the future. Based on concrete approaches tested by practitioners, the interactive discussion aims to: discuss the localization agenda by understanding what it implies in practice, why it matters (while trying to build forward together), how to define the local (legitimate voices) and how to value and strengthen the local resilience; identify emerging operational challenges of its implementation; and identify specific recommendations for the Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs, multilateral institutions and civil society actors. To this end, the workshop will bring together key staff of the Dutch MFA, implementing partners from the Department of Stability and Humanitarian Aid (DSH) as well as researchers working on both SRL and humanitarian issues. Agenda 14:00  Welcome & introduction, KPSRL 14:05  Setting the scene: Why does localization matter for building back better, and what is the role of civil society? CARE Nederland 14:15  Story telling panel discussion: Panelists will reflect on their own experiences and will share best practices supporting localization for inclusive and sustainable recovery in fragile and conflict affected settings 14:55  Plenary Q&A, moderated by KPSRL 15:30  Wrap up & closing, KPSRL Panelists The Cash Learning Partnership (CaLP) - José Jódar Vidal, Senior Technical Officer Presenting main findings and priority actions about Cash and Vouchers Assistance and localization highlighted in the State of the World Cash Report (SOWC) 2020. NORCAP - Katja Jose, Lake Chad Programme Manager & Marga Ledo, Expert, Cash Response Team/CashCap Sharing NORCAP’s approach, experience, lessons learned, challenges and “building back better” opportunities related to localization, reflecting in particular on NORCAP’s two flagship programmes – Lake Chad Basin programme and CashCap. Mercy Corps - Danielle Jolicoeur, Regional Resilience Director for Africa: Sharing approaches and experiences from the DRC and Somalia. Department of Stability and Humanitarian Aid (DSH) representative, Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs reflecting on experiences shared by panelists. Click here for the full concept note. Image credits: Community Development Council Meething. Zaragaran Village. Mazar-e-Sharif. Citizen’s Charter Afghanistan Project. 4-6-2017. Photo: Rumi Consultancy/World Bank